Open Science Research Excellence

Open Science Index

Commenced in January 2007 Frequency: Monthly Edition: International Paper Count: 9

9
10009829
Application of Sorptive Passive Panels for Reducing Indoor Formaldehyde Level: Effect of Environmental Conditions
Abstract:

Reducing formaldehyde concentration in residential buildings is an important challenge, especially during the summer. In this study, a ceiling tile was used as a sorptive passive panel for formaldehyde removal. The performance of this passive panel was evaluated under different environmental conditions. The results demonstrated that the removal efficiency is comprised between 40% and 71%. Change in the level of relative humidity (30%, 50%, and 75%) had a slight positive effect on the sorption capacity. However, increase in temperature from 21 °C to 26 °C led to approximately 7% decrease in the average formaldehyde removal performance. GC/MS and HPLC analysis revealed the formation of different by-products at low concentrations under extreme environmental conditions. These findings suggest that the passive panel selected for this study holds the potential to be used for formaldehyde removal under various conditions.

8
10006601
Gluability of Bambusa balcooa and Bambusa vulgaris for Development of Laminated Panels
Abstract:
The development of value added composite products from bamboo with the application of gluing technology can play a vital role in economic development and also in forest resource conservation of any country. In this study, the gluability of Bambusa balcooa and Bambusa vulgaris, two locally grown bamboo species of Bangladesh was assessed. As the culm wall thickness of bamboos decreases from bottom to top, a culm portion of up to 5.4 m and 3.6 m were used from the base of B. balcooa and B. vulgaris, respectively, to get rectangular strips of uniform thickness. The color of the B. vulgaris strips was yellowish brown and that of B. balcooa was reddish brown. The strips were treated in borax-boric, bleaching and carbonization for extending the service life of the laminates. The preservative treatments changed the color of the strips. Borax–boric acid treated strips were reddish brown. When bleached with hydrogen peroxide, the color of the strips turned into whitish yellow. Carbonization produced dark brownish strips having coffee flavor. Chemical constituents for untreated and treated strips were determined. B. vulgaris was more acidic than B. balcooa. Then the treated strips were used to develop three-layered bamboo laminated panel. Urea formaldehyde (UF) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA) were used as binder. The shear strength and abrasive resistance of the panel were evaluated. It was found that the shear strength of the UF-panel was higher than the PVA-panel for all treatments. Between the species, gluability of B. vulgaris was better and in some cases better than hardwood species. The abrasive resistance of B. balcooa is slightly higher than B. vulgaris; however, the latter was preferred as it showed well gluability. The panels could be used as structural panel, floor tiles, flat pack furniture component, and wall panel etc. However, further research on durability and creep behavior of the product in service condition is warranted.
7
10000547
Properties of Bio-Phenol Formaldehyde Composites Filled with Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber
Abstract:

Bio-composites derived from plant fiber and/or bioderived polymer, are likely more ecofriendly and demonstrate competitive performance with petroleum based composites. In this research, the bio phenol-formaldehyde (bio-PF) was used as a matrix and oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber (EFB) as reinforcement. The matrix was synthesized via liquefaction and condensation to enhance the combination of phenol and formaldehyde, during the process. Then, the bio-PF was mixed with different percentage of EFB (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) and molded at 180oC. The samples that viewed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed an excellent wettability and interaction between EFB and matrix. Samples of 10% EFB gave the optimum properties of impact and hardness meanwhile sample 15% of EFB gave the highest reading of flexural modulus (MOE) and flexural strength (MOR). For thermal stability analysis, it was found that the weight loss and the activation energy (Ea) of the bio-composites samples were decreased as the filler content increased.

6
9998535
Photocatalytic Oxidation of Gaseous Formaldehyde Using the TiO2 Coated SF Filter
Abstract:

The research work covered in this study includes the morphological structure and optical properties of TiO2-coated silk fibroin (SF) filters at 2.5% wt. TiO2/vol. PVA solution. SEM micrographs revealed the fibrous morphology of the TiO2-coated SF filters. An average diameter of the SF fiber was estimated to be approximately 10µm. Also, it was confirmed that TiO2 can be adhered more on SF filter surface at higher TiO2 dosages. The activity of semiconductor materials was studied by UV-VIS spectrophotometer method. The spectral data recorded shows the strong cut off at 390 nm. The calculated band-gap energy was about 3.19 eV. The photocatalytic activity of the filter was tested for gaseous formaldehyde removal in a modeling room with the total volume of 2.66 m3. The highest removal efficiency (54.72 ± 1.75%) was obtained at the initial formaldehyde concentration of about 5.00 ± 0.50ppm.

5
17142
Mechanical Properties of Particle Boards from Maize Cob and Urea-Formaldehyde Resin
Abstract:

Particle boards were prepared from Maize cob (MC) and urea-formaldehyde resin (UFR) on compression moulding machine. The amount of MC was varied from 50-120g while 30g of UFR was kept constant. Some mechanical properties of the particle boards were tested using the standard ASM methods. The results show that as the MC content increased from 50- 120g in 30g UFR, the hardness increased from about 6.89 x 102 to7.51 x 102MPa. Impact strength decreased from 3.3x 10-2 to 0.45 x 10-2J/M2, while tensile strength initially increased from 2.63 x 102 to 3.14 x 102 MPa as the MC increased from 50 to 60g in 30g UFR, thereafter, it decreased to about 1.35 x 102MPa at 120g in 30g content.

4
16531
Changes to Oxidative Stress Levels Following Exposure to Formaldehyde in Lymphocytes
Abstract:

Formaldehyde is the illegal chemical substance used for food preservation in fish and vegetable. It can promote carcinogenesis. Superoxide dismutases are the important antioxidative enzymes that catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The resultant level of oxidative stress in formaldehyde-treated lymphocytes was investigated. The formaldehyde concentrations of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 120μmol/L were treated in human lymphocytes for 12 hours. After 12 treated hours, the superoxide dismutase activity change was measured in formaldehyde-treated lymphocytes. The results showed that the formaldehyde concentrations of 60, 80 and 120μmol/L significantly decreased superoxide dismutase activities in lymphocytes (P < 0.05). The change of superoxide dismutase activity in formaldehyde-treated lymphocytes may be the biomarker for detect cellular injury, such as damage to DNA, due to formaldehyde exposure.

3
4646
Adsorption Capacity of Chitosan Beads in Toxic Solutions
Abstract:
The efficiency of chitosan beads processed from 4 marine animal shells; white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), mud crab (Scylla sp.), horseshoe crab (Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda), and cuttlefish bone (Sepia sp.), for the adsorption experiments of ammonia and formaldehyde were investigated. The porosities of chitosan from the shells looked like beads were distinctly examined under SEM. The original pores of those shells on the surface areas compose of evenly fine pores. The shell beads of cuttlefish bone and horseshoe crab show the larger probably even porosity, while on those white leg shrimp and mud crab contain various large and fine pores. The best adsorption at pH 9 in 18 mg/l ammonia at 2 hours yield on cuttlefish bone, horseshoe crab, mud crab and white leg shrimp with the average percent of 59.12, 51.45, 45.66 and 43.52, respectively. Within 30 minutes the formaldehyde absorbers (at pH 5 in 8 μg/ml) revealed 46.27, 26.56, and 18.04 percent capacities in cuttlefish bone, mud crab and white leg shrimp beads; while 22.44 percent in the horseshoe crab at pH 7. The adsorption capacities and the amounts of beads showed a positive correlation. The adsorption capacity relationship between pH and the gas concentrations were affected by these qualities of chitosan beads.
2
5422
Evaluation of Solid Phase Micro-extraction with Standard Testing Method for Formaldehyde Determination
Abstract:
In this study, solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) was optimized to improve the sensitivity and accuracy in formaldehyde determination for plywood panels. Further work has been carried out to compare the newly developed technique with existing method which reacts formaldehyde collected in desiccators with acetyl acetone reagent (DC-AA). In SPME, formaldehyde was first derivatized with O-(2,3,4,5,6 pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) and analysis was then performed by gas chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). SPME data subjected to various wood species gave satisfactory results, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) obtained in the range of 3.1-10.3%. It was also well correlated with DC values, giving a correlation coefficient, RSQ, of 0.959. The quantitative analysis of formaldehyde by SPME was an alternative in wood industry with great potential
1
10061
Physical and Mechanical Properties of Particleboard from Bamboo Waste
Abstract:
This research was to evaluate a technical feasibility of making single-layer experimental particleboard panels from bamboo waste (Dendrocalamus asper Backer) by converting bamboo into strips, which are used to make laminated bamboo furniture. Variable factors were density (600, 700 and 800 kg/m3) and temperature of condition (25, 40 and 55 °C). The experimental panels were tested for their physical and mechanical properties including modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), internal bonding strength (IB), screw holding strength (SH) and thickness swelling values according to the procedures defined by Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS). The test result of mechanical properties showed that the MOR, MOE and IB values were not in the set criteria, except the MOR values at the density of 700 kg/m3 at 25 °C and at the density of 800 kg/m3 at 25 and 40 °C, the IB values at the density of 600 kg/m3, at 40 °C, and at the density of 800 kg/m3 at 55 °C. The SH values had the test result according to the set standard, except with the density of 600 kg/m3, at 40 and 55 °C. Conclusively, a valuable renewable biomass, bamboo waste could be used to manufacture boards.
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