Open Science Research Excellence

Open Science Index

Commenced in January 2007 Frequency: Monthly Edition: International Paper Count: 10

10
9997783
Effect of Hull-Less Barley Flakes and Malt Extract on Yoghurt Quality
Abstract:

The aim of the research was to evaluate the influence of flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract on quality of yoghurt during its storage.

The results showed that the concentration of added malt extract and storage time influenced the changes of pH and lactic acid in yoghurt samples. Sensory properties – aroma, taste, consistency and appearance – of yoghurt enriched with flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract changed significantly (p<0.05) during storage. Yoghurt with increased proportion of malt extract had sweeter taste and more flowing consistency. Sensory properties (taste, aroma, consistency and appearance) of yoghurt samples enriched with 5% flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain (YFBG 5%) and 5% flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and 2% malt extract (YFBG 5% ME 2%) did not change significantly during one week of storage.

9
16088
Microbiological Assessment of Yoghurt Enriched with Flakes from Barley Grain and Malt Extract during Shelf-Life
Abstract:

The effect of flakes from biologically activated hullless barley grain and malt extract on microbiological safety of yoghurt was studied. Pasteurized milk, freeze-dried yoghurt culture YF-L811 (Chr. Hansen, Denmark), flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain (Latvia) and malt extract (Ilgezeem, Latvia) were used for experiments. Yoghurt samples with flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract were analyzed for total plate count of mesophylic aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms, as well yeasts and moulds population during shelflife. Results showed that the changes of pH and titratable acidity affected the concentration of added malt extract. The lowest pH and the highest titratable acidity were determined in samples YFBG5% ME4% and YFBG5% ME6% on the 14th day. The total plate count decreased in all yoghurt samples except sample YFBG5% ME6%, where was determined the increase of microorganisms from 7th till 14th day. The adding of flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain in yoghurt samples caused the higher initial content of yeasts and moulds comparing with control. The growth of yeasts and moulds during shelf-life provided the added malt extract in yoghurt samples. Yoghurt enriched with flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract from a microbiological perspective is safe product.

8
12097
The Chemical Composition of Yoghurt Enriched with Flakes from Biologically Activated Hullless Barley Grain and Malt Extract
Authors:
Abstract:
The influence of flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract on chemical composition of yoghurt was studied. Pasteurized milk, freeze-dried yoghurt culture YF-L811 (Chr. Hansen, Denmark), flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain (Latvia) and malt extract (Ilgezeem, Latvia) were used for experiments. Yoghurt samples with and without flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract were analyzed for content of total solids, total proteins, fats, amino acids and riboflavin. The addition of flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract allowed increase of nutritional value of yoghurt samples. There was obtained the increase of total proteins (p>0.05) and the decrease of fat (p>0.05). The presence of flakes from biologically activated hull-less barley grain and malt extract in yoghurt samples provided significant increase of amino acids amount (p
7
11836
Dynamic Modeling of Underwater Manipulator and Its Simulation
Abstract:

High redundancy and strong uncertainty are two main characteristics for underwater robotic manipulators with unlimited workspace and mobility, but they also make the motion planning and control difficult and complex. In order to setup the groundwork for the research on control schemes, the mathematical representation is built by using the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) method [9]&[12]; in addition to the geometry of the manipulator which was studied for establishing the direct and inverse kinematics. Then, the dynamic model is developed and used by employing the Lagrange theorem. Furthermore, derivation and computer simulation is accomplished using the MATLAB environment. The result obtained is compared with mechanical system dynamics analysis software, ADAMS. In addition, the creation of intelligent artificial skin using Interlink Force Sensing ResistorTM technology is presented as groundwork for future work

6
12285
Processing and Assessment of Quality Characteristics of Composite Baby Foods
Abstract:
The usefulness of weaning foods to meet the nutrient needs of children is well recognized, and most of them are precooked roller dried mixtures of cereal and/or legume flours which posses a high viscosity and bulk when reconstituted. The objective of this study was to formulate composite weaning foods using cereals, malted legumes and vegetable powders and analyze them for nutrients, functional properties and sensory attributes. Selected legumes (green gram and lentil) were germinated, dried and dehulled. Roasted wheat, rice, carrot powder and skim milk powder also were used. All the ingredients were mixed in different proportions to get four formulations, made into 30% slurry and dried in roller drier. The products were analyzed for proximate principles, mineral content, functional and sensory qualities. The results of analysis showed following range of constituents per 100g of formulations on dry weight basis, protein, 18.1-18.9 g ; fat, 0.78-1.36 g ; iron, 5.09-6.53 mg; calcium, 265-310 mg. The lowest water absorption capacity was in case of wheat green gram based and the highest was in rice lentil based sample. Overall sensory qualities of all foods were graded as “good" and “very good" with no significant differences. The results confirm that formulated weaning foods were nutritionally superior, functionally appropriate and organoleptically acceptable.
5
2749
Heritability Estimates of Lactation Traits in Maltese Goat
Abstract:
Data on 657 lactation from 163 Maltese goat, collected over a 5-year period were analyzed by a mixed model to estimate the variance components for heritability. The considered lactation traits were: milk yield (MY) and lactation length (LL). Year, parity and type of birth (single or twin) were significant sources of variation for lactation length; on the other hand milk yield was significantly influenced only by the year. The average MY was 352.34 kg and the average LL was 230 days. Estimates of heritability were 0.21 and 0.15 for MY and LL respectively. These values suggest there is low correlation between genotype and phenotype so it may be difficult to evaluate animals directly on phenotype. So, the genetic improvement of this breed may be quite slow without the support of progeny test aimed to select Maltese breeders.
4
14577
Nutritional Evaluation of Sorghum Flour (Sorghumbicolor L. Moench) During Processing of Injera
Abstract:
The present study was carried out to evaluate the nutritional value of sorghum flour during processing of injera (unleavened thick bread). The proximate composition of sorghum flour before and after fermentation and that of injera was determined. Compared to the raw flour and fermented one, injera had low protein (11.55%), ash (1.57%) and fat (2.40%) contents but high in fiber content. Moreover, injera was found to have significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher energy (389.08 Kcal/100g) compared to raw and fermented sorghum flour. Injera contained lower levels of anti-nutritional factors (polyphenols, phytate and tannins) compared to raw and fermented sorghum. Also it was found to be rich in Ca (4.75mg/100g), Fe (3.95 mg/100g), and Cu (0.7 mg/100g) compared to that of raw and fermented flour. Moreover, both the extractable minerals and protein digestibility were high for injera due to low amount of anti-nutrients. Injera was found to contain an appreciable amount of amino acids except arginine and tyrosine.
3
7906
Optimization of Enzymatic Activities in Malting of Oat
Abstract:
Malting is usually carried out on intact barley seed, while hull is still attached to it. In this study, oat grain with and without hull was subjected to controlled germination to optimize its enzymes activity, in such a way that lipase has the lowest and α- amylase and proteinase the highest activities. Since pH has a great impact on the activity of the enzymes, the pH of germination media was set up to 3 to 8. In dehulled oats, lipase and α-amylase had the lowest and highest activities in pHs 3 and 6, respectively whereas the highest proteinase activity was evidenced at pH 7 and 4 in the oats with and without hull respectively. While measurements indicated that the effect of hull on the enzyme activities particularly in lipase and amylase at each level of the pH are significantly different, the best results were obtained in those samples in which their hull had been removed. However, since the similar lipase activity in germinated dehulled oat were recorded at the pHs 4 and 5, therefore it was concluded that pH 5 in dehulled oat seed may provide the optimum enzyme activity for all the enzymes.
2
4377
Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction and Feedback in Touchscreen Icon
Abstract:

In order to enhance the usability of the human computer interface (HCI) on the touchscreen, this study explored the optimal tactile depth and effect of visual cues on the user-s tendency to touch the touchscreen icons. The experimental program was designed on the touchscreen in this study. Results indicated that the ratio of the icon size to the tactile depth was 1:0.106. There were significant effects of experienced users and novices on the tactile feedback depth (p < 0.01). In addition, the results proved that the visual cues provided a feedback that helped to guide the user-s touch icons accurately and increased the capture efficiency for a tactile recognition field. This tactile recognition field was 18.6 mm in length. There was consistency between the experienced users and novices under the visual cue effects. Finally, the study developed an applied design with touch feedback for touchscreen icons.

1
7035
Distributed Detection and Optimal Traffic-blocking of Network Worms
Abstract:
Despite the recent surge of research in control of worm propagation, currently, there is no effective defense system against such cyber attacks. We first design a distributed detection architecture called Detection via Distributed Blackholes (DDBH). Our novel detection mechanism could be implemented via virtual honeypots or honeynets. Simulation results show that a worm can be detected with virtual honeypots on only 3% of the nodes. Moreover, the worm is detected when less than 1.5% of the nodes are infected. We then develop two control strategies: (1) optimal dynamic trafficblocking, for which we determine the condition that guarantees minimum number of removed nodes when the worm is contained and (2) predictive dynamic traffic-blocking–a realistic deployment of the optimal strategy on scale-free graphs. The predictive dynamic traffic-blocking, coupled with the DDBH, ensures that more than 40% of the network is unaffected by the propagation at the time when the worm is contained.
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